‘The Holy Mountain’ 1973

In a corrupt, greed-fueled world, a powerful alchemist leads a Christ-like character and seven materialistic figures to the Holy Mountain, where they hope to achieve enlightenment.

A Christlike figure wanders through bizarre, grotesque scenarios filled with religious and sacrilegious imagery. He meets a mystical guide who introduces him to seven wealthy and powerful people, each representing a planet in the Solar system. These seven, along with the protagonist, the guide and the guide’s assistant, divest themselves of their worldly goods and form a group of nine who will seek the Holy Mountain, in order to displace the gods who live there and become immortal.

The Holy Mountain, reissued as The Sacred Mountain, is a 1973 Mexican surrealist fantasy film directed, written, produced, co-scored, co-edited by and starring Alejandro Jodorowsky, who also participated as a set designer and costume designer on the film. The film was produced by Beatles manager Allen Klein of ABKCO Music and Records, after Jodorowsky scored an underground phenomenon with El Topo and the acclaim of both John Lennon and George Harrison (Lennon and Yoko Ono put up production money). It was shown at various international film festivals in 1973, including Cannes, and limited screenings in New York and San Francisco.

Inspiration

The film is based on Ascent of Mount Carmel by John of the Cross and Mount Analogue by René Daumal, who was a student of George Gurdjieff. In this film, much of Jodorowsky’s visually psychedelic story follows the metaphysical thrust of Mount Analogue. This is revealed in such events as the climb to the alchemist, the assembly of individuals with specific skills, the discovery of the mountain that unites Heaven and Earth “that cannot not exist”, and symbolic challenges along the mountain ascent. Daumal died before finishing his allegorical novel, and Jodorowsky’s improvised ending provides a way of completing the work (both symbolically and otherwise).

Advertisements

‘Mortdecai’ 2015

Juggling some angry Russians, the British Mi5, his impossibly leggy wife and an international terrorist, debonair art dealer and part time rogue Charlie Mortdecai (Johnny Depp) must traverse the globe armed only with his good looks and special charm in a race to recover a stolen painting rumored to contain the code to a lost bank account filled with Nazi gold.


Even after reading many bad reviews, I still think this film is a charm. My guess is that many old-head movie buffs might feel a bit offended by his more recent eccentric characters. Although I do agree that most of his characters from older films are some of his best; Johnny Depp is something like a chameleon, he transforms into his characters gracefully it seems and forms new life within them. So to me Johnny Depp can play both a serious and or nutty character. Or really whatever he wishes to play because he is indeed Johnny Depp. He plays all his characters well as he is an amazing actor and deserves credit. Where ever you are Johnny I’m on your side.

About this film, its an adventure and a comedy (among a few other genres), which to me stirs up the perfect cup of coffee; or movie in this case, ha! The movie poster itself put a smile on my face and left me eager to watch what ‘Mortdecai’ was all about.

A hilarious film that had me laughing from the moment I saw Charlie Mortdecai’s ostentatious mustache flaring and his humorous stride. I couldn’t keep my eyes off. There are many funny scenes within this film and of course couldn’t have been funny without Charlie Mortedcai’s gestures, mannerisms and mustache.

Say what you will, but I love this film because its weird, funny and takes me on an adventure with an eccentric character.

‘Adventures of Baron Munchausen’ 1988

During the “Age of Reason” of the late 18th century, the Turkish army lays siege to a European city where a theater production about the extraordinary heroics of famed German aristocrat Baron Münchhausen is underway. A man steps forward to object that the performance is full of inaccuracies, claiming that he is the real Baron Münchhausen (John Neville). When the Turkish army approaches with gunfire, the baron undertakes his latest adventure with his promise to defend the city.

“Weird to the Gilliamth degree!”

‘The Darjeeling Limited’ 2007

Estranged brothers Francis (Owen Wilson), Peter (Adrien Brody) and Jack (Jason Schwartzman) reunite for a train trip across India. The siblings have not spoken in over a year, ever since their father passed away. Francis is recovering from a motorcycle accident, Peter cannot cope with his wife’s pregnancy, and Jack cannot get over his ex-lover. The brothers fall into old patterns of behavior as Francis reveals the real reason for the reunion: to visit their mother in a Himalayan convent.

‘The Secret Life of Walter Mitty’ 2013

 

Walter Mitty (Ben Stiller) lives life through his daydreams, but when his job along with that of his co-worker (Kristen Wiig) are threatened, Walter takes action in the real world embarking on a global journey that turns into an adventure more extraordinary than anything he could have ever imagined.

‘The Fall’ 2006

In a hospital on the outskirts of 1920s Los Angeles, an injured stuntman begins to tell a fellow patient, a little girl with a broken arm, a fantastic story of five mythical heroes. Thanks to his fractured state of mind and her vivid imagination, the line between fiction and reality blurs as the tale advances.

The Fall is a 2006 adventure fantasy film directed by Tarsem Singh, starring Lee Pace, Catinca Untaru, and Justine Waddell. It is based on the screenplay of the 1981 Bulgarian film Yo Ho Ho by Valeri Petrov.