‘American Psycho’ 2000

Patrick Bateman is handsome, well educated and intelligent. He is twenty-seven and living his own American dream. He works by day on Wall Street, earning a fortune to complement the one he was born with. At night he descends into madness, as he experiments with fear and violence.

Reception

American Psycho debuted at the Sundance Film Festival, where it polarized audiences and critics; some showered the film with praise, others with scorn. Upon its theatrical release, however, the film received positive reviews in crucial publications, including The New York Times which called it a “mean and lean horror comedy classic”. Roger Ebert gave the film three out of four stars and praised Christian Bale’s performance as being “heroic in the way he allows the character to leap joyfully into despicability; there is no instinct for self-preservation here, and that is one mark of a good actor”. In his review for the Los Angeles Times, Kenneth Turan wrote, “The difficult truth is that the more viewers can model themselves after protagonist Bateman, the more they can distance themselves from the human reality of the slick violence that fills the screen and take it all as some kind of a cool joke, the more they are likely to enjoy this stillborn, pointless piece of work”. Newsweek magazine’s David Ansen wrote, “But after an hour of dissecting the ’80s culture of materialism, narcissism and greed, the movie begins to repeat itself. It becomes more grisly and surreal, but not more interesting”. In his review for the Village Voice, J. Hoberman wrote, “If anything, Bale is too knowing. He eagerly works within the constraints of the quotation marks Harron puts around his performance”.

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‘Mortdecai’ 2015

Juggling some angry Russians, the British Mi5, his impossibly leggy wife and an international terrorist, debonair art dealer and part time rogue Charlie Mortdecai (Johnny Depp) must traverse the globe armed only with his good looks and special charm in a race to recover a stolen painting rumored to contain the code to a lost bank account filled with Nazi gold.


Even after reading many bad reviews, I still think this film is a charm. My guess is that many old-head movie buffs might feel a bit offended by his more recent eccentric characters. Although I do agree that most of his characters from older films are some of his best; Johnny Depp is something like a chameleon, he transforms into his characters gracefully it seems and forms new life within them. So to me Johnny Depp can play both a serious and or nutty character. Or really whatever he wishes to play because he is indeed Johnny Depp. He plays all his characters well as he is an amazing actor and deserves credit. Where ever you are Johnny I’m on your side.

About this film, its an adventure and a comedy (among a few other genres), which to me stirs up the perfect cup of coffee; or movie in this case, ha! The movie poster itself put a smile on my face and left me eager to watch what ‘Mortdecai’ was all about.

A hilarious film that had me laughing from the moment I saw Charlie Mortdecai’s ostentatious mustache flaring and his humorous stride. I couldn’t keep my eyes off. There are many funny scenes within this film and of course couldn’t have been funny without Charlie Mortedcai’s gestures, mannerisms and mustache.

Say what you will, but I love this film because its weird, funny and takes me on an adventure with an eccentric character.

‘A Clockwork Orange’ 1971

A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 dystopian crime film adapted, produced, and directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on Anthony Burgess’s 1962 novel A Clockwork Orange. It employs disturbing, violent images to comment on psychiatry, juvenile delinquency, youth gangs, and other social, political, and economic subjects in a dystopian near-future Britain.

Alex (Malcolm McDowell), the main character, is a charismatic, sociopathic delinquent whose interests include classical music (especially Beethoven), rape, and what is termed “ultra-violence”. He leads a small gang of thugs (Pete, Georgie, and Dim), whom he calls his droogs (from the Russian word друг, “friend,” “buddy”). The film chronicles the horrific crime spree of his gang, his capture, and attempted rehabilitation via controversial psychological conditioning. Alex narrates most of the film in Nadsat, a fractured adolescent slang composed of Slavic (especially Russian), English, and Cockney rhyming slang.